Apocalypse Now – 1979 Francis Ford Coppola

2020-07-03T10:31:27+00:00

Apocalypse Now is the second best film of all-time, which makes it the greatest war film, perhaps the greatest singular usage of set pieces in cinema, coppola’s finest film, amongst other praise I’d love to

Apocalypse Now – 1979 Francis Ford Coppola2020-07-03T10:31:27+00:00

My Cousin Vinny – 1992 Jonathan Lynn

2017-09-13T17:51:57+00:00

The film is a pretty straight forward fish-out-of-water comedy elevated by two performances: joe pesci and marisa tomei The supporting actors are solid- the judge, Fred Gwynne, is great as is bruce McGill in a

My Cousin Vinny – 1992 Jonathan Lynn2017-09-13T17:51:57+00:00

1959

2020-07-03T10:31:27+00:00

best film:  The lasting power and brilliance of Francois Truffaut’s 400 blows has snuck up on me through the years. It’s a genre of coming-of-age youth that’s well-worn at this point (with exceptions like the

19592020-07-03T10:31:27+00:00

The Passion of Anna – 1969 Bergman

2017-09-08T15:11:28+00:00

  It’s his second color effort—his first since 1964’s critically panned satire all these women. Very complex characters- particularly Von Sydow and Ullmann—a lonely man with a habit of lying and a spirited woman possessed

The Passion of Anna – 1969 Bergman2017-09-08T15:11:28+00:00

The Fountain – 2006 Aronofsky

2017-09-07T19:51:10+00:00

The film repeats the line “death is the road to awe” and awe is the best way to describe this film. It’s luminous beauty is unmatched by 99.9% of cinema ever made The three stories

The Fountain – 2006 Aronofsky2017-09-07T19:51:10+00:00

1958

2020-07-03T10:31:27+00:00

best film:  Vertigo is the right choice here despite such a wonderful experimental effort from Welles and my top film from Satyajit Ray. Vertigo is my top rated Hitchcock film and he’s the greatest director

19582020-07-03T10:31:27+00:00

1957

2020-07-03T10:31:27+00:00

best film:  the seventh seal may not quite be the stylistic exercise persona is but it has bergman’s greatest narrative (which ranks it amongst the greatest of all-time) and iconic imagery that has justifiably solidified itself alongside some of

19572020-07-03T10:31:27+00:00

Wind River – 2017 Sheridan

2018-01-05T21:30:48+00:00

Sheridan has quickly become one of the greatest writers working in cinema today with sicario, hell or high water and then this- which he directed. He’s not nearly as good a director as Villeneuve or

Wind River – 2017 Sheridan2018-01-05T21:30:48+00:00

Shame – 1968 Bergman

2020-07-03T10:31:29+00:00

It’s hard to keep track of all the brilliant collaborations with Bergman, his muse liv Ullman, max von sydow, gunnar bjornstrand and dp sven nykvist but this one has the distinction of being bergman’s only

Shame – 1968 Bergman2020-07-03T10:31:29+00:00

Alice – 1990 Allen

2020-07-03T10:31:29+00:00

It never comes right out and says it but Allen is far too literate to name his character/film alice and have the general narrative about alternative choices upon drug intake and not invoke Lewis Carroll

Alice – 1990 Allen2020-07-03T10:31:29+00:00

Frost/Nixon – 2008 Howard

2017-09-05T20:06:31+00:00

The film is in the archvies because of the strong two performances from Michael Sheen and Frank Langella (Oscar nom here… 5 total noms here for the film which is wild) The performances are not

Frost/Nixon – 2008 Howard2017-09-05T20:06:31+00:00

1956

2020-07-03T10:31:29+00:00

best film: The Searchers is the greatest film of all-time. The bookend shots through the doorway are the best moments in cinema history. most underrated:  Melville’s ultra-chic Bob Le Flambeur is ranked # 878 and that’s

19562020-07-03T10:31:29+00:00
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