• Quote opening about how we’re all wild animals and then the images of the soldiers smiling and posing over a kill
  • background making shorts works here combining works
  • 10 minutes in before the credits and song
  • Medicine is one of Weerasethakul’s obsessions- we have a dog (of one of the protagonists) dying. There’s discussions about how one of the two lovers will “never die a natural death”
  • It’s a slow-moving neo-realist like (and rather toothless) love story first half
  • Pop music again 53 minutes in and we go into a full break back out into country and the entire jungle stalking sequence- about half way in
  • Is this love? Jealously? A dream?
  • Seas of green in the mise-en-scene. 20 minutes of stalking, lost in night landscapes but Weerasethakul hasn’t fully learned to frame like he would in 2006’s Syndromes and a Century
  • Tribal drawings intercut with jungle stalking second half
  • The monkey speaks to one of the characters about how the tiger is his “prey and companion”
  • Won the Jury prize at Cannes- #251 all-time on TSPDT
  • Sensory experience
  • Duality is a motif for Weerasethakul for sure- two worlds, two halves- film breaks about half way through
  • The musical cues are embellished and dissident—off—Godard in Contempt almost mocking conventional cinema
  • Greens in the mise-en-scene — trees
  • Western medicine- sterile- white
  • You’re baffled 30 minutes in by the top 250 TSPDT status- again, I think it’s a ruse and a set-up for mystic naturalism finale like Blissfully Yours
  • New credits half way in- tiger drawing
  • Medication on repression- how we all hide
  • Very much admire the formal construct and ingenuity but it’s tough viewing- excited for a future bluray release
  • Final half is largely silent-
  • Malick shot through trees up to the sun
  • Dream/reincarnation/afterlife/ghost of cow
  • HR