• A film that’s ambitious in ideas and script, but not overly ambitious in film as art or filmmaking if you will
  • There are a couple of really nice shots—one of them is late with Lupita walking into the funhouse, the other is of the young Adelaide character at night walking on the beach with the lit up roller coaster surrounding her in the deep background
  • A strong musical score—uses and rifts on “I Got 5 on it” by the Luniz
  • I see the Lynch comparisons because of the doppelgänger (which is used throughout to strong effect). The Hitchcock comparisons or Carpenter comparisons just have to be because Peele is trying to “elevate” the thriller or horror genre to high art (not that it needs to be elevated). Villeneuve actually accomplished a bit more than Peele here in Enemy in 2013 (if we’re talking doppelgängers) which is no insult- that film is very good
  • Use of red in a few spots, the body suit of course, the red apple young Adelaide is carrying
  • Winston Duke is the comic relief here operating in an entirely different movie than the rest of the characters like Lil Rel Howery was in Get Out. Peele is dedicated to this approach. I have mixed feelings on it—it acts as comedy as I said and Peele is a talented comedian—a bit of an audience surrogate saying, often, and hilariously, “this is absurd”.  But it also is by it’s nature bad form and can take you out of it at key moments of terror (like the aftermath of the climax in Get Out with the flawed one-liner from Howery). Duke’s nuclear family dad is like Chevy Chase in the vacation films
  • I see some Aronofsky but I think it’s more Mother (ambitious in ideas/allegory)than Black Swan (ambitious in style) even if it’s Swan with the doppelgänger
  • I don’t love Peele saying his “Americans” metaphor out lout and underlining it. I didn’t love von Trier doing it in Dogville but at least von Trier did it with a David Bowie song and it was during the closing credits.
  • The auteur I see the most is to compare Peele to is M. Night Shyamalan—Peele is making social statements with his films (there’s a sociopolitical reading here of course and a more internal philosophical one—both work) unlike Shyamalan the reveal here and the spoiler nature of it, the genre he’s working in, and the level of artistic achievement feels on par here
  • Recommend