• The debut film for Chang-dong Lee (Burning)
  • Green titles, green train, green seats on train— he’s wearing green camouflage—ribbon in her hair late— seems influenced by Zhang Yimou’s Raise the Red Lantern or Kieslowski’s color trilogy or both
  • A thoughtful use of color beyond just the objects— there’s a green tinting in the lighting in much of the film
  • Seong-kun Mun is a character in an existential crisis- lost—much like Burning actually- disillusioned about his home town in this case— changing, but nothing for him to do after his military service, his brothers and family at home is one side of the coin, the “big brother” and other “brothers” in organized crime another- duality
  • Lots of good 80’s score notes. It isn’t half as good as either score but there’s hits of Once Upon a Time in America and Blade Runner
  • A love triangle again like Burning – rich and evil vs our main lost protagonist here – we even have the girl with the haunted past
  • The themes and some of the visuals are there—but it’s choppy, flawed and stilted—
  • Great shot of the two male leads looking at the city skyline at dusk on the roof with standing water and reflection off it in the foreground
  • Staging another shot with the three in a frame
  • A slow-burn making of a gangster like A Prophet from Jacques Audiard
  • He lights her scarf on fire— beautifully reflected in sunglasses
  • A big violent outburst like Burning
  • Chance meeting of the two “families” at the end is very well done- somber—lots of greens and we have a rural-looking shop with the city in the background- duality
  • Recommend