• A subtle character study—a story of first love and addition
  • The final shot sticks with you—it’s a giant door opening—sounds simple- but given the context of the film, her awakening, naivety (not just sexual, but about life in general)—we’re going from the sealed off movie studio here to opening the door to the outside- an amazing visual metaphor
  • The film, and it’s in the text, references the Jean-Honoré Fragonard titular artwork—intelligent discussion between Honor Swinton Byrne and Tom Burke. Both leads are really good here—Swinton Byrne is Tilda’s daughter (who also excels, as she always does, in a small role here) – her looks almost resemble Keira Knightley more so than Tilda though—Tom Burke is a mixture of an English Stacey Keach and a young Albert Finney with the requisite mixture of charm and acidity
  • Great shot of Swinton Byrne on a pay phone through an open door, another stand out is on a date of theirs in a room flooded with lamps—I wouldn’t go as far as calling it a triumph of mise-en-scene though
  • It feels like a found film from 1983 (which both a description and a compliment to the costume and décor work)—16mm—I see the Rohmer influence—it could be a lost Rohmer film (in English obviously)
  • Recommend