The Revenant – 2015 Iñárritu

2020-07-03T10:28:25+00:00

A masterpiece of staggering beauty and cinematic aweOpens with a dream montage – incredible imagery, and then we’re off and running with the hunting scene starting with the camera aimed down at the stream and

The Revenant – 2015 Iñárritu2020-07-03T10:28:25+00:00

Death in Venice – 1971 Visconti

2020-07-03T10:28:25+00:00

A stylistic break for Visconti for the most part— there is some nice blocking and framing in the dining sequences (flowers galore), beach sequences (see below) but here- Visconti mostly uses the slow zoom as

Death in Venice – 1971 Visconti2020-07-03T10:28:25+00:00

Prisoners – 2013 Villeneuve

2020-07-03T10:28:25+00:00

A very strong opening frame from Villeneuve and DP “Roget Deakins—gorgeous picture of the woods and then the Lord’s prayer from Hugh Jackman’s Keller Dover A very strong opening frame from Villeneuve and DP “Roget

Prisoners – 2013 Villeneuve2020-07-03T10:28:25+00:00

The Leopard – 1963 Visconti

2020-07-03T10:28:25+00:00

Made at the height of the era for the epic genre—Visconti’s masterpiece stakes a legitimate claim to be named one of cinema’s most beautiful films It opens with a series of sumptuous establishing shots of

The Leopard – 1963 Visconti2020-07-03T10:28:25+00:00

The 157th Best Director of All-Time: Anthony Mann

2020-07-03T10:28:27+00:00

Anthony Mann. Mann has 14 archiveable films—unreal—that’s the most at this point with the auteurs remaining who I haven’t yet mentioned as the best 156 directors of all-time. Still- it’s not just about quantity- he

The 157th Best Director of All-Time: Anthony Mann2020-07-03T10:28:27+00:00

The 156th Best Director of All-Time: Baz Luhrmann

2020-07-03T10:28:27+00:00

Luhrmann. Baz is the Australian expressionist auteur who is a style-plus director with a abbreviated filmography. Finding a style-plus director outside of my top 150 directors is rare- so that’s the main case for Baz

The 156th Best Director of All-Time: Baz Luhrmann2020-07-03T10:28:27+00:00

Welcome to L.A. – 1976 Rudolph

2020-07-03T10:28:27+00:00

Alan Rudolph’s third film and the first of eight films in the archives Certainly Rudolph is the most Altman-like of all the Altman acolytes—he worked with him and on projects like Nashville and The Long

Welcome to L.A. – 1976 Rudolph2020-07-03T10:28:27+00:00
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