• It is a big step back from 1965’s The Ipcress File– but the next film in the Harry Palmer spy series still has a solid narrative—and Caine is strong again- but the visuals are not on the same level. This is praise for Sidney Furie who directed The Ipcress File—because DP Otto Heller worked on both films.
  • This series has much in common with the Bond series. It was known by many as the “thinking man’s Bond” (I’ll agree this is a little less broad) and Caine’s Palmer even jokes about his lack of sex appeal in the film. But both are British Cold War spies in a series. Further tying them together we have Guy Hamilton at the helm here- he shot Goldfinger in 1964, and then after this would shoot Diamonds Are Forever in 1971 and Live and Let Die in 1973.
  • Espionage, “follow the man wearing the green carnation” spy games– 1966 Berlin (shot on location to great effect), defecting
  • A great shot through a loop of a hanging light fixture at 21 minutes
  • A low-angle shot of Caine with a light fixture (a different one than the one noted above) in the background at 47 minutes in Ross’ office- a little ceiling-as-background work- this isn’t the shot but it is the fixture here I the image

A low-angle shot of Caine with a light fixture (a different one than the one noted above) in the background at 47 minutes in Ross’ office- a little ceiling-as-background work- this isn’t the shot but it is the fixture here I the image

  • The best shot of the film easily is the shot on the room with the viewfinder and the Mercedes sign (above) in the background Caine is there with Günter Meisner (a guy with a menacing mug— he’s Slugworth from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory). Hamilton and Heller beautiful frame and block the two characters (with the viewfinder)
  • Recommend but not in the top 10 of 1966