The Rocket From Calabuch – 1956 Berlanga

2021-04-30T10:31:41+00:00

Berlanga’s fourth film, he brings back the wry voice-over and the small town just like his debut Welcome Mr. Marshall! (1953). He even gives us the number of the people living in the village (928)

The Rocket From Calabuch – 1956 Berlanga2021-04-30T10:31:41+00:00

1973

2021-04-29T17:36:09+00:00

best film:  Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid from Sam Peckinpah barely edges out the five other masterpieces from 1973 for the top slot. This sort of quietly gives Peckinpah the best film of the

19732021-04-29T17:36:09+00:00

Boyfriend in Sight – 1954 Berlanga

2021-03-16T15:59:36+00:00

Berlanga’s third film, brimming with nostalgia for youth, romance and summer. Set in “Europe 1918” Berlanga’s trademark quick wit—“the highest he ever got in the army was draft dogger”. Under 90 minutes Breezy, Monsieur Hulot's

Boyfriend in Sight – 1954 Berlanga2021-03-16T15:59:36+00:00

A Separation – 2011 Farhadi

2021-04-26T23:06:52+00:00

Asghar Farhadi’s fifth film is a profound meditation on divorce (every bit on the level of Kramer vs. Kramer, Marriage Story) and class (every bit on the level Parasite) Opens with a three-minute shot

A Separation – 2011 Farhadi2021-04-26T23:06:52+00:00

Welcome Mr. Marshall! – 1953 Berlanga

2021-03-16T14:12:48+00:00

The debut film from Spanish auteur Luis García Berlanga Welcome Mr. Marshall! is made in the vein of Preston Sturges. An average small village in Spain prepares themselves for the arrival of American visitors—and comedy

Welcome Mr. Marshall! – 1953 Berlanga2021-03-16T14:12:48+00:00

Aladdin – 1992 Clements, Musker

2021-04-25T12:30:52+00:00

Aladdin fell smack dab in the middle of Disney’s renaissance or boom of hand-drawn animated musicals during the late 1980’s and early 1990’s—a run of six years that started with The Little Mermaid (1989), went

Aladdin – 1992 Clements, Musker2021-04-25T12:30:52+00:00

Band of Outsiders – 1964 Godard

2021-04-24T14:29:49+00:00

Band of Outsiders or Bande à part makes for a worthy companion to Breathless. These may be the two most accessible works of Godard’s career (not that he’s an auteur where “accessibility” is a major

Band of Outsiders – 1964 Godard2021-04-24T14:29:49+00:00

True Grit – 2010 Coen

2021-04-24T14:47:47+00:00

For their fifteen film the Coen brothers chose to adapt the work of Charles Portis (author of True Grit) in their first outright western (certainly No Country For Old Men is a western in many

True Grit – 2010 Coen2021-04-24T14:47:47+00:00

Contempt – 1963 Godard

2021-04-23T15:07:50+00:00

Godard at the peak of his powers. Astoundingly, this is Godard’s sixth film—all since his debut in 1960 of course. This is Godard’s second film in color with the wider format (after A Woman is

Contempt – 1963 Godard2021-04-23T15:07:50+00:00

Sparkle – 1976 O’Steen

2021-04-24T23:15:29+00:00

There is a lot of talent working here in Sparkle. Curtis Mayfield (Super Fly) does the score and songs, Bruce Surtees (Dirty Harry, Lenny) is the cinematographer, and I find it nearly impossible to believe

Sparkle – 1976 O’Steen2021-04-24T23:15:29+00:00

1972

2021-04-21T13:06:07+00:00

best film:  The Godfather from Francis Ford Coppola It’s certainly not hard to find aspects to praise even after ten viewings of the film The opening long take is an absolute stunner and certainly not

19722021-04-21T13:06:07+00:00

Cronos – 1993 del Toro

2021-04-20T13:03:50+00:00

Guillermo del Toro was just 29-years young at the time of the release of his debut film Cronos. Only two years earlier Cuaron made his debut with Sólo con tu pareja (1991)—the two of them

Cronos – 1993 del Toro2021-04-20T13:03:50+00:00
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