Timbuktu – 2014 Sissako

2020-09-21T14:16:39+00:00

It is really a film about an occupation of a town– that’s Sissako’s message. In a way it isn’t much different from Shane or Rio Bravo (or say German films made during the occupation like

Timbuktu – 2014 Sissako2020-09-21T14:16:39+00:00

The Sweet Hereafter – 1997 Egoyan

2020-09-21T13:46:06+00:00

An emphatic follow-up to 1994’s Exotica—Egoyan proves himself to one of cinema’s finest directors during this stretch of time in the mid-1990’s—compiling now twin achievements of  pain and loss Like Exotica, this starts with a

The Sweet Hereafter – 1997 Egoyan2020-09-21T13:46:06+00:00

Exotica – 1994 Egoyan

2020-09-20T13:49:36+00:00

Egoyan’s Exotica is Altman’s Nashville or Sayles' Matewan- except for this ensemble mosaic has a jungle “exotic”-themed strip club meeting place as its linking device instead of a city Egoyan’s Exotica is Altman’s Nashville

Exotica – 1994 Egoyan2020-09-20T13:49:36+00:00

Silver Linings Playbook – 2012 O. Russell

2020-09-20T12:28:01+00:00

One of the great love stories of the 2010’s featuring David O. Russell’s trademark rat-a-tat dialogue, the expansive, combative dysfunctional family (part actual family part surrogate), and some of the best acting of 2012.

Silver Linings Playbook – 2012 O. Russell2020-09-20T12:28:01+00:00

Calendar – 1993 Egoyan

2020-09-19T12:46:11+00:00

Egoyan’s fifth film is his greatest accomplishment in film form to date—this low-budget (he’s back to the 16mm/video oscillating like 1987’s Family Viewing), short film (74 minutes) casts a hypnotic structural spell The film bounces

Calendar – 1993 Egoyan2020-09-19T12:46:11+00:00

The Adjuster – 1991 Egoyan

2020-09-19T12:07:18+00:00

From the opening titles, this, his fourth feature, is clearly a  step-up for Canadian auteur Atom Egoyan when it comes to budget and production value (for the first time no 16mm or video here) Egoyan

The Adjuster – 1991 Egoyan2020-09-19T12:07:18+00:00

The Seventh Seal – 1957 Bergman

2020-09-18T20:03:20+00:00

Bergman’s first masterpiece—and a landmark film in 1950’s cinema A gray film- severe in tint and mood—Bergman sets the tone with the choir reigning down during the opening as we set out with the young

The Seventh Seal – 1957 Bergman2020-09-18T20:03:20+00:00

The Rules of Attraction – 2002 Avary

2020-09-18T18:00:23+00:00

Roger Avary’s The Rules of Attraction It is from Bret Easton Ellis’ second novel (between Less Than Zero and American Psycho) and lives in the same lexicon as Ellis’ work- Sean Bateman- played by James

The Rules of Attraction – 2002 Avary2020-09-18T18:00:23+00:00

Chinatown – 1974 Polanski

2020-09-18T16:14:40+00:00

One of the greatest pure narrative films and screenplays in the history of cinema. It isn’t simply a beautiful mechanism that is set-up and unravels--- it sprawls---nuanced and layered. You sometimes hear about a film

Chinatown – 1974 Polanski2020-09-18T16:14:40+00:00

Mâdadayo – 1993 Kurosawa

2020-09-16T16:03:00+00:00

The final film from Kurosawa- 83 years old when he made the film-- one of the cinema’s greatest artists It is about a retired professor—he’s a simple man, a good man, sentimental (the cat stuff

Mâdadayo – 1993 Kurosawa2020-09-16T16:03:00+00:00

Family Viewing – 1987 Egoyan

2020-09-15T13:18:06+00:00

Like his debut Next of Kin in 1984- Atom Egoyan’s Family Viewing (second film) is a fascinating family drama – a sort of bizarre coming of age story about a seemingly disturbed young man coming

Family Viewing – 1987 Egoyan2020-09-15T13:18:06+00:00

Arizona Dream – 1993 Kusturica

2020-09-14T18:08:33+00:00

Delightfully unpredictable-- Emir Kusturica’s English language debut is a blend of surrealism narrative stream-of-consciousness and (seemingly) improvisation Johnny Depp stars- and he’s good here, as are Faye Dunaway, Lili Taylor and Vincent Gallo (Jerry Lewis

Arizona Dream – 1993 Kusturica2020-09-14T18:08:33+00:00
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