Red Beard – 1965 Kurosawa

2020-08-07T14:33:15+00:00

The end of an era for Kurosawa- his last film in black and white, his last film (sixteen total I believe) with Mifune, and last film of the 1960’s (it is my understanding there were

Red Beard – 1965 Kurosawa2020-08-07T14:33:15+00:00

White Dog – 1982 Fuller

2020-08-06T19:01:42+00:00

Not surprising that this wild tale is based on a true story (Fuller’s  modus operandi usually) --- it is violent and charmingly crude Never released in the US in theater – and it does have

White Dog – 1982 Fuller2020-08-06T19:01:42+00:00

Celine and Julie Go Boating – 1974 Rivette

2020-08-05T10:59:49+00:00

Rivette’s fifth film- a 193 minute comedy shot in a grainy crude 16mm Mixes the comic whimsy of Juliet Berto and Dominique Labourier (they have an undeniable chemistry), mystery and magic, and an airy self-awareness

Celine and Julie Go Boating – 1974 Rivette2020-08-05T10:59:49+00:00

High and Low – 1963 Kurosawa

2020-08-04T16:25:03+00:00

I may not be quite ready to make it yet, but I think there’s a legit argument to this being Kurosawa’s greatest single work—and his 1960’s being even stronger than his run during the 1950’s

High and Low – 1963 Kurosawa2020-08-04T16:25:03+00:00

The Big Red One – 1980 Fuller

2020-08-02T14:49:46+00:00

It is the film that meant the most (along with Park Row) to Fuller, and the one he was leading up to his entire life. War (Fuller was a WWII vet and much of this

The Big Red One – 1980 Fuller2020-08-02T14:49:46+00:00

The Adventures of Tintin – 2011 Spielberg

2020-08-02T13:07:30+00:00

It certainly isn’t an essential part of the Spielberg canon- but enough elements worthy of praise to slip into the archives The credit sequence is certainly one of the greatest moments of the film—reminiscent of

The Adventures of Tintin – 2011 Spielberg2020-08-02T13:07:30+00:00

The Nun – 1966 Rivette

2020-07-31T13:55:42+00:00

Rivette’s dedication to the visual motif of imprisonment, bars holding Anna Karina’s Suzanne is quite the formal achievement Rivette’s second feature after 1961’s Paris Belongs To Us. Godard had made 9 features in that time-

The Nun – 1966 Rivette2020-07-31T13:55:42+00:00

Paris Belongs to Us – 1961 Rivette

2020-07-31T12:55:35+00:00

The debut French New Wave auteur Jacques Rivette—a leisurely-paced, but fascinating paranoia-infused opaque mystery 142 minutes for a debut- indeed, even early, Rivette is the long-form voice from the New Wave A strong opening as

Paris Belongs to Us – 1961 Rivette2020-07-31T12:55:35+00:00

Big Wednesday – 1978 Milius

2020-07-30T16:27:22+00:00

Chiefly, the carefully structured form of the story into four sections, is worthy of admiration. For every chapter break, Milius, a great writer, has the voice-over set to the landscapes of the shoreline. He names

Big Wednesday – 1978 Milius2020-07-30T16:27:22+00:00

Sanjuro – 1962 Kurosawa

2020-07-29T17:21:18+00:00

The narrative lacks the brilliance and freshness of Yojimbo (that can happen with sequels- same music borrowed here) and the worldview is a little more optimistic than Kurosawa’s finest work—but damn, Kurosawa sets up immaculate

Sanjuro – 1962 Kurosawa2020-07-29T17:21:18+00:00

Bedazzled – 1967 Donen

2020-07-28T20:41:02+00:00

A very funny film, it is no great accomplishment for Stanley Donen—any number of directors could have pointed the camera and comedians Dudley Moore and Peter Cook Moore and Cook were a sketch comedy duo—talented.

Bedazzled – 1967 Donen2020-07-28T20:41:02+00:00

The Naked Kiss – 1964 Fuller

2020-07-28T17:35:22+00:00

An abnormal blend of B-movie melodrama and crime thriller—only Sam Fuller could deliver A strong opening- hand-held camera of Constance Towers (back with Fuller from their work together the year before in Shock Corridor) in

The Naked Kiss – 1964 Fuller2020-07-28T17:35:22+00:00
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